iWash – Uganda

The UN's sustainable development goal #6 aims to ensure sustainable water management and good access to sanitation services for all by 2030. Therefore, the W Initiative supports Right to Play and their iWASH project in Uganda.

A project in Partnership with Right To Play

Today, 2.2 billion of the world's population does not have clean drinking water, and in Uganda alone, 9 million children lack access to drinking water and handwashing facilities at school. This has fatal consequences, both for children's health and their education. Proper sanitation is essential to boost children's attendance in classrooms and ensure they complete their education.

- Access to clean water and good hygiene practices is vital. Not only does it improve children's health and give them a better chance of completing school, they also become agents of change for their parents and can spread knowledge that has a ripple effect for an entire community, says Jimmy Vika, National Director at Right To Play.

Especially for girls, proper and safe sanitary facilities at school are crucial. Many girls miss one to four days of school a month or drop out of school altogether once they reach puberty, and the need for proper and safe sanitary conditions is increasing.

Right To Play
Right To Play
Right To Play
Right To Play

Facts

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Through the iWASH project, 4,620 children between the ages of three and eight will have stable access to clean drinking water and 2,200 girls will receive toilet facilities and training in menstrual hygiene.

Facts

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Today, 2.2 billion of the world's population is without clean drinking water.

W Initiative and iWASH will improve sanitary and drinking water conditions for 4620 children

The iWASH project expands on Right To Play’s and UNICEF's previous projects in Uganda and will increase access to safe, clean and gender-sensitive sanitation facilities for refugee children and children in the communities of Isingiro, Kamwenge and Kyegegwa. The W Initiative will work closely with Right To Play throughout the project, contributing capital, expertise and personal involvement. iWASH provides training in, and disseminates knowledge of, hygiene practices that prevent illness and strengthen the learning environment in primary schools. The project will be implemented in 47 pre-schools and 12 primary schools and will improve sanitary and drinking water conditions for 4620 children over 12 months.

This will be done by building gender-specific toilet facilities, building changing rooms with access to water for girls and providing them with training in menstrual hygiene and the use of sanitary products in connection with menstruation. Drinking water tanks and handwashing facilities will also be installed in schools, and teachers and adult staff will be trained in good hygiene practices. Through the iWASH project, 4,620 children between the ages of three and eight will have stable access to clean drinking water and 2,200 girls will have toilet facilities and training in menstrual hygiene.

- In the last year there has been an increased focus on handwashing and hygiene routines that prevent illness. Unfortunately, clean water and proper sanitation is a commodity not everyone has access to. Right To Play's iWASH project lays the foundations for children's health and their routines around disease prevention and is a natural place to start. “I'm looking forward to getting started”, says Gustav M. Witzøe, founder of the W Initiative.

W Initiative will support Right To Play and iWash with 2 billion NOK.

About Right To Play

The organisation was founded in 2000 by Johann Olav Koss. For over 20 years, Right To Play has been present in some of the most difficult and vulnerable countries in the world and works to ensure children go to school and complete their education, are protected, overcome prejudice, stay healthy and are empowered. For more information, visit www.righttoplay.no

ACCESS TO CLEAN WATER AND GOOD HYGIENE PRACTICES ARE VITAL
Jimmy Vika
National Director Right To Play